Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Feature Article 

Common Problems in Hospitalized Older Adults: Four Programs to Improve Care

Christine Palmisano-Mills, MA

Abstract

Hospitalized older adults are vulnerable to many conditions that can cause functional decline. According to Inouye, Bogardus, Baker, Leo-Summers, and Cooney (2000), 34% to 50% of hospitalized older adults experience poor health outcomes, which can prolong their hospital stay, increase their risk for institutionalization, and increase hospital costs and mortality rates. The objectives of this article are to present national models that have been successful, identify hospitals in Connecticut that are using the models, and to discuss and compare interventions and protocols within Connecticut hospitals. A survey was designed to gather data from 32 hospitals in Connecticut. Twenty-four hospital professionals responded (response rate = 75%), and the majority was found to be creative and eager to share ideas to improve the quality of care.

Abstract

Hospitalized older adults are vulnerable to many conditions that can cause functional decline. According to Inouye, Bogardus, Baker, Leo-Summers, and Cooney (2000), 34% to 50% of hospitalized older adults experience poor health outcomes, which can prolong their hospital stay, increase their risk for institutionalization, and increase hospital costs and mortality rates. The objectives of this article are to present national models that have been successful, identify hospitals in Connecticut that are using the models, and to discuss and compare interventions and protocols within Connecticut hospitals. A survey was designed to gather data from 32 hospitals in Connecticut. Twenty-four hospital professionals responded (response rate = 75%), and the majority was found to be creative and eager to share ideas to improve the quality of care.

ABSTRACT

Hospitalized older adults are vulnerable to many conditions that can cause functional decline. According to Inouye, Bogardus, Baker, Leo-Summers, and Cooney (2000), 34% to 50% of hospitalized older adults experience poor health outcomes, which can prolong their hospital stay, increase their risk for institutionalization, and increase hospital costs and mortality rates. The objectives of this article are to present national models that have been successful, identify hospitals in Connecticut that are using the models, and to discuss and compare interventions and protocols within Connecticut hospitals. A survey was designed to gather data from 32 hospitals in Connecticut. Twenty-four hospital professionals responded (response rate = 75%), and the majority was found to be creative and eager to share ideas to improve the quality of care.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ms. Palmisano-Mills is a gerontologist, Plantsville, Connecticut.

Address correspondence to Christine Palmisano-Mills, MA, P.O. Box 274, Plantsville, CT 06479; e-mail: chrismprod@aol.com.

Authors

Ms. Palmisano-Mills is a gerontologist, Plantsville, Connecticut.

Address correspondence to Christine Palmisano-Mills, MA, P.O. Box 274, Plantsville, CT 06479; e-mail: chrismprod@aol.com.

10.3928/00989134-20070101-09

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