North American Menopause Society

North American Menopause Society

Source:

Healio Interview


Disclosures: Faubion reports no relevant financial disclosures.

September 29, 2021
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Video: Three nonhormone therapies promise vasomotor symptom relief

Source:

Healio Interview


Disclosures: Faubion reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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In this video, NAMS medical director Stephanie Faubion, MD, discusses highlights from her presentation at the organization’s annual meeting on nonhormone therapies currently being investigated for the management of vasomotor symptoms.

These therapies include oxybutynin, an antimuscarinic and anticholinergic agent used to manage overactive bladder symptoms and hyperhidrosis, that can reduce vasomotor symptom frequency and severity. Its long-term use presents dementia concerns, though.

“However, it still may be an option for short-term use for women during the menopause transition who are unwilling or unable to use hormonal therapies,” Faubion said.

Also, neurokinin 3 receptor antagonists are now in phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms. Their effects on weight and on cardiovascular, bone, brain and sexual health are unknown, and their long-term safety and efficacy have not been established yet. Yet researchers say they appear to rapidly reduce hot flash frequency and severity.

“There are several drugs in development right now, and these compounds appear to be extremely effective in reducing vasomotor symptoms within about 48 hours,” she said.

Finally, the naturally occurring estrogen estetrol (E4) reduced vasomotor frequency and severity while improving the vaginal maturation index in initial studies. It also was recently approved in the United States and Canada for contraceptive use, and it is now under investigation for vasomotor symptom management as well.

“There are some data out there that show that it is effective in reducing hot flashes and also treat vaginal dryness,” Faubion said.

Reference:

  • Faubion S, Vasomotor symptom management: What’s on the horizon? Presented at: North American Menopause Society Annual Meeting; Sept. 22-25, 2021; Washington, D.C.