Source:

Hansen H, et al. COVID-19: Insights from Respiratory Physiotherapists. Presented at: European Respiratory Society International Congress; Sept. 5-8, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Hansen reports no relevant financial disclosures.
October 06, 2021
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Physical, self-reported abnormalities present 3 months post-COVID-19, regardless of severity

Source:

Hansen H, et al. COVID-19: Insights from Respiratory Physiotherapists. Presented at: European Respiratory Society International Congress; Sept. 5-8, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Hansen reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Three months after acute COVID-19, patients reported several physical and self-reported abnormalities, and there was no difference between patients who were or were not hospitalized, researchers reported.

The cross-sectional study enrolled 57 patients with previous COVID-19 infection from March to August 2020 (mean age, 51 years; 51% women). The aim was to assess physical capacity and self-reported symptoms 3 months after COVID-19 in patients who were hospitalized (n = 34) and those who were not hospitalized (n = 23). All patients had persistent symptoms and underwent lung function, cycling exercise tests, 1-minute sit-to-stand, handgrip strength and patient-reported outcome assessments.

COVID-19
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Researchers observed one or more abnormal finding among all patients, with no difference for any outcome between hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients, according to data presented during a virtual European Respiratory Society International Congress session.

However, 45.5% of all patients had a 1-minute sit-to-stand assessment below the 25th percentile and 29.1% of all patients had a handgrip strength score below this percentile. Sixty-three percent of patients had respiratory symptoms (COPD Assessment Test score 10) and 42% of patients reported their overall health as those below Danish normal values.

In addition, researchers found a peak work capacity of 95% expected and preserved with no desaturation of ECG dysfunction.

Hansen said it is important to determine the severity of an individual’s COVID-19 symptoms, including their relations to hospitalizations, sex and comorbidities.

“We did not find any difference between the hospitalized and nonhospitalized groups 3 months post-COVID-19 infection in patient-reported outcomes and physical performance outcomes,” Henrik Hansen, MD, professor in the respiratory research unit in the department of respiratory medicine at Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark, said during his presentation said. “Quality of life was significantly lower when it’s compared to Danish values; respiratory symptoms were definitely present, especially in concern of the domains of energy, sleep, breathlessness and chest pain; and physical performance [was] overall preserved, but with a known proportion of patients below the 25th percentile in functional outcomes, suggesting that some patients might need consultation to regain a higher level of physical function.”