SLEEP

SLEEP

Source: Abstract 236. Presented at: SLEEP; June 10-13, 2021 (virtual meeting).


Disclosures: Healio Primary Care could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.
June 15, 2021
2 min read
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Cannabis use tied to poor nightly sleep patterns

Source: Abstract 236. Presented at: SLEEP; June 10-13, 2021 (virtual meeting).


Disclosures: Healio Primary Care could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.
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Recent cannabis users were more likely to report inadequate sleep durations than individuals who did not recently use cannabis, according to researchers. The association appeared to be stronger in heavy cannabis users.

“The prevalence of cannabis and cannabinoid use continues to increase, aided by widespread decriminalization and gradual destigmatization," Calvin Diep, a first-year resident in the department of anesthesiology and pain medicine at the University of Toronto, told Healio Primary Care. “While these agents are popularly used as sleep aids, their effects on sleep are not yet certain. At the same time, the prevalence of sleep deprivation appears to be on the rise and the relationship to cannabis use patterns in the population are curious.”

 The quote is “Recent and regular cannabis use is associated with both extremes of nightly sleep duration — too little and too much." The source of the quote is Calvin Diep

Diep and colleagues analyzed data from 21,766 people who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2005 and 2018. Of that total, 3,135 reported using cannabis in the past 30 days and were deemed recent cannabis users.

The findings were published in Sleep, the journal of the Sleep Research Society, and recently presented at the society’s annual meeting, held virtually.

The researchers reported that cannabis users were more likely than those with no recent cannabis use to report sleeping fewer than 6 hours a night (adjusted OR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57). Recent users were also more likely to report problems falling asleep, staying asleep or getting too much sleep in the past 2 weeks (aOR = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.09-1.35). Recent users were also more likely to have told their physician about these sleep issues (aOR = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37).

The researchers characterized individuals who used cannabis at least 20 of the past 30 days as heavy users. These individuals were more likely than moderate users to report inadequate sleep durations, according to Diep and colleagues.

“Recent and regular cannabis use is associated with both extremes of nightly sleep duration — too little and too much,” Diep said in the interview. “More frequent use appears to result in an even stronger association.”

He noted that excessive use of cannabis — like any substance “of potential abuse,” including prescription medications — “can be problematic.”

“Moderation is key,” he said. “Primary care physicians can engage with their patients and assist them in making informed decisions about their health by counseling about the currently known harms of cannabis to balance against the anticipated benefits.”