COVID-19 Resource Center
COVID-19 Resource Center
Source:

CDC. Cleaning and disinfecting your facility. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/disinfecting-building-facility.html. Accessed April 6, 2021.

Disclosures: Walensky reports no relevant financial disclosures.
April 06, 2021
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CDC updates guidance on cleaning surfaces based on ‘low’ risk for transmission

Source:

CDC. Cleaning and disinfecting your facility. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/disinfecting-building-facility.html. Accessed April 6, 2021.

Disclosures: Walensky reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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The CDC updated its guidance on cleaning and disinfecting homes and facilities to say that, in most cases, cleaning surfaces with soap or detergent is sufficient to reduce the risk for SARS-CoV-2 spread.

Rochelle P. Walensky

“People can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 through contact with contaminated surfaces and objects. However, evidence has demonstrated that the risk by this route of transmission is actually low,” CDC Director Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH, said in a press briefing on Monday.

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“Cleaning with household cleaners containing soap or detergent will physically remove germs from surfaces. This process does not necessarily kill germs, but reduces the risk of infection by removing them,” Walensky said. “Disinfecting uses a chemical product, which is a process that kills the germs on the surfaces. In most situations, regular cleaning of surfaces with soap and detergent, not necessarily disinfecting those surfaces, is enough to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread.”

The CDC now recommends cleaning and disinfecting any surface within 24 hours after contact with a known or suspected case of COVID-19. Previously, it recommended cleaning or disinfecting indoor surfaces for up to 7 days in these situations, a CDC spokesperson told Healio.

If it has been more than 24 hours but less than 3 days since contact with a known or suspected case of COVID-19, only cleaning the area is needed, but not disinfection, the spokesperson said.

“Disinfection is only recommended in indoor settings — schools and homes — where there has been a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19 within the last 24 hours,” Walensky said. “Also, in most cases, fogging, fumigation and wide-area electrostatic spraying is not recommended as a primary method of disinfection and has several safety risks to consider.”

Walensky said the risk for surface transmission also can be reduced by wearing masks, washing hands and following federal guidance on maintaining a healthy facility. SARS-CoV-2 is primarily transmitted through close person-to-person contact.