COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Perspective from Amesh A. Adalja, MD
Perspective from Kathryn M. Edwards, MD
Source:

Moderna. Moderna announces it has shipped variant-specific vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273.351, to NIH for clinical study. https://investors.modernatx.com/news-releases/news-release-details/moderna-announces-it-has-shipped-variant-specific-vaccine. Accessed February 25, 2021.

Disclosures: Bancel is employed by Moderna. Offit reports no relevant financial disclosures.
February 25, 2021
2 min read
Save

Moderna sends variant-specific vaccine to NIH for clinical study

Perspective from Amesh A. Adalja, MD
Perspective from Kathryn M. Edwards, MD
Source:

Moderna. Moderna announces it has shipped variant-specific vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273.351, to NIH for clinical study. https://investors.modernatx.com/news-releases/news-release-details/moderna-announces-it-has-shipped-variant-specific-vaccine. Accessed February 25, 2021.

Disclosures: Bancel is employed by Moderna. Offit reports no relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Moderna said it has modified its COVID-19 vaccine to target the B.1.351 variant and shipped doses to the NIH for phase 1 testing.

The original vaccine, mRNA-1273, has been shown to be highly efficacious against wild-type SARS-CoV-2 and is one of two messenger RNA-based COVID-19 vaccines already authorized for use in the United States. The vaccine also protected against emerging variants in lab experiments, although it demonstrated reduced activity against the B.1.351 variant first identified in South Africa.

 Source: Adobe Stock
Source: Adobe Stock

Moderna said it was exploring several strategies to address emerging variants “out of an abundance of caution.”

The trial to test the B.1.351-specific booster will be led and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which codeveloped the original vaccine.

Paul A. Offit

“I think it makes sense to begin phase 1 dose ranging trials of the B.1.351 variant ... in case the variant resists vaccine-induced immunity,” Paul A. Offit, MD, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, told Healio.

Moderna said it is pursuing three different approaches to boosting:

A variant-specific booster candidate, mRNA-1273.351, based on the B.1.351 variant originating in South Africa. This would be at 50 µg per dose or less.

A multivariant booster candidate, mRNA-1273.211, which would combine mRNA-1273, Moderna’s authorized vaccine against the wild-type strain of SARS-CoV-2, and mRNA-1273.351 in a single vaccine of 50 µg per dose or less.

A third dose of the authorized mRNA-1273 vaccine as a 50 µg booster dose.

An additional strategy includes assessing mRNA-1273.351 and mRNA-1273.211 as a primary vaccination series for people who are seronegative in a two-dose series at a 100 µg doses or less.

Moderna noted that all strategies are subject to FDA review.

The company said it will evaluate immunogenicity and safety in participants who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as participants in clinical studies who have received the mRNA-1273 vaccine.

“We look forward to beginning the clinical study of our variant booster and are grateful for the NIH’s continued collaboration to combat this pandemic,” Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said in a statement. “Leveraging the flexibility of our mRNA platform, we are moving quickly to test updates to the vaccines that address emerging variants of the virus in the clinic.”