Source/Disclosures
Source: Healio Coverage
June 05, 2020
1 min read
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Top in GI: Bleeding risk with aspirin, dietary gluten and IBD

Source/Disclosures
Source: Healio Coverage
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Data from Digestive Disease Week showed that aspirin nearly doubled the risk for serious upper gastrointestinal bleeds in older adults. It was the top story in gastroenterology last week.

Another top story was about a study that found no link between dietary gluten intake and an increased risk for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease among women without celiac disease.

Aspirin
Aspirin nearly doubled the risk for serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding events in older adults, according to data from Digestive Disease Week. 

Read these and more top stories in gastroenterology below:

Aspirin doubles risk for upper GI bleeding events in older adults

Aspirin almost doubles the risk for serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding in older people and can further increase with age, smoking, chronic kidney disease and NSAIDs, according to data from Digestive Disease Week. Read more.

Dietary gluten does not increase Crohn’s, UC in women without celiac disease

No correlation was seen between dietary gluten intake and the risk for incidence Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis among women without celiac disease, according to data from Digestive Disease Week. Read more.

Negative screening colonoscopy linked with reduced CRC, mortality

A single negative screening colonoscopy correlated with reduced colorectal cancer incidence and mortality for up to 17.4 years, according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Read more.

One-third of IBD patients do not undergo objective assessment, TDM

Approximately one-third of patients who underwent either a biologic dose change or discontinuation did not undergo objective disease activity assessment or therapeutic drug monitoring before therapy was altered, according to data from Digestive Disease Week. Read more.

IBD pain not well controlled during hospitalization

Pain scores in patients with inflammatory bowel disease did not improve during hospitalization despite high opioid use, according to research published in Digestive Disease and Sciences. Read more.