May 26, 2020
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Top in cardiology: RAAS antagonists, anticoagulation and COVID-19

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Emerging data suggest that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or RAAS, antagonists do not worsen outcomes of COVID-19, confirming recommendations released in March by various cardiology societies that patients who become infected with the coronavirus while receiving RAAS antagonists should continue to take them. This was the top story in cardiology last week.

Another top story was about research that showed systemic anticoagulation therapy improved mortality rates among patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

Read these and more top stories in cardiology below:

Evidence suggests no COVID-19-related harm from RAAS antagonists

Because the virus that causes COVID-19 acts through the ACE2 receptor, there was concern that use of RAAS antagonists such as ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are used to treat hypertension, heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions, might predispose people to COVID-19 or worsen its effects. But emerging data suggest that concern is unfounded. Read more.

hospital bed 
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who received systemic anticoagulation had improved mortality rates compared with those who did not receive the treatment, according to recent research.
Source: Adobe Stock

Systemic anticoagulation may improve outcomes in COVID-19 hospitalizations

Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who received systemic anticoagulation had improved mortality rates compared with those who did not receive the treatment, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Read more.

Gradual return to exercise after COVID-19 requires ‘cautious approach’

In patients with COVID-19, the severity of the disease and the possibility of cardiovascular involvement should be taken into account when considering a return to intense exercise training and competition. Myocyte invasion caused by SARS-CoV-2 can lead to myocarditis, which could then result in arrhythmias, cardiac dysfunction and death, researchers wrote in a viewpoint published in JAMA Cardiology. Read more.

Some CV medications prescribed less often to women than men

Women with established CVD had lower rates of prescriptions for statins, aspirin and ACE inhibitors compared with men, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Read more.

BP lowering with antihypertensive medication may reduce dementia risk

Patients taking antihypertensive medications had lower risk for incident dementia or cognitive impairment compared with control groups, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in JAMA. Read more.