November 27, 2019
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Continuous glucose monitor alarm settings affect outcomes, severe hypoglycemia can lead to acute coronary syndrome — top stories in endocrinology

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One of the week’s top stories in endocrinology was about a study that found adults with type 1 diabetes who used a higher glucose threshold for hypoglycemia alarms during continuous glucose monitor therapy spent approximately 50% less time in hypoglycemia.

Findings that showed older adults with diabetes who experienced severe hypoglycemia may be at a higher risk for developing acute coronary syndrome — particularly in the 10 days following a severe hypoglycemic episode — was another top story.

Continuous glucose monitor alarm settings may improve glucose outcomes in type 1 diabetes

A cohort of adults with type 1 diabetes using continuous glucose monitor therapy spent about 50% less time in hypoglycemia and 65% less time in severe hypoglycemia when using a higher glucose threshold for hypoglycemia alarms, according to findings from an observational study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. Read more.

Severe hypoglycemia can quickly lead to acute coronary syndrome among older patients

Older adults with diabetes may be more likely to develop acute coronary syndrome if they experience severe hypoglycemia, according to findings published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation. Read more.

Glycemic management possible with small-molecule glucagon receptor antagonist

Among a cohort of adults with type 2 diabetes, HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose were effectively reduced via treatment with the small-molecule glucagon receptor antagonist RVT-1502, according to findings published in Diabetes Care. Read more.

Insulin sensitivity goes in ‘opposite directions’ for transgender men, women after hormone therapy

After undergoing 1 year of gender-affirming hormone therapy, transgender men appear to experience increased insulin sensitivity whereas insulin sensitivity tends to decrease for transgender women, according to findings published in Diabetes Care. Read more.

Thyroid screening unnecessary when symptoms not present: Canadian task force

Adults who do not display symptoms of thyroid dysfunction should not be screened for such conditions, according to a recommendation statement from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care published in CMAJ. Read more.