September 20, 2018
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CDC: US Alzheimer’s disease burden expected to increase 178% by 2060

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The burden of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias in the U.S. will nearly double by 2060, according to a CDC press release.

The announcement coincided with CDC research based on U.S. Census projections and CMS percentages of Medicare Fee-for-Service beneficiaries aged at least 65 years that was recently published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

Besides the overall U.S. burden, which has been updated over time, researchers predicted Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias by race and ethnicity by 2060 for the first time.

Among the findings:

  • In 2014, the overall burden of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias was 5 million people, or 1.6% of the population, and was expected to grow 178% to 13.9 million, or 3.3% of the population, in 2060.
  • In 2014, black adults aged at least 65 years had the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (13.8%), followed by Hispanics (12.2%) and non-Hispanic whites (10.3%).
  • In 2060, the number of Hispanic adults with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias was expected to climb to 3.2 million; CDC estimated there will be 2.2 million black adults with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia.

“We have assumed that the prevalence estimates in 2014 will be constant over time. Given the heterogeneity in research results, some have argued that the evidence is not strong enough to deduce a trend different than a stable age-specific prevalence,” Kevin A. Matthews, PhD, of the CDC’s division of population health, and colleagues wrote.

Older adult looking confused
The burden of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias in the U.S. will nearly double by 2060, according to a CDC press release.
Photo Source: Adobe

“These findings may also be complicated by the temporal changes in dementia diagnosis thresholds and recording practices and shifts in survey methods, among other factors,” they added.

CDC has data and early assessment and diagnosis tools on its website for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, the release stated. – by Janel Miller

Disclosure: Healio Family Medicine could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.