American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Meeting

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Meeting

March 03, 2015
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Xolair-exposed pregnancies show slight risk for negative birth outcomes

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HOUSTON — Results from the ongoing prospective, observational EXPECT study presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting indicate small percentages of negative birth outcomes among women who received Xolair 8 weeks before conception or during pregnancy.

Researchers assessed pregnancy outcomes among 186 women exposed to Xolair (omalizumab, Genentech) within 8 weeks before conception or during pregnancy. Data were collected at study enrollment, each trimester of pregnancy, delivery and up to 18 months after delivery. There were 174 live births of 178 infants during the study period. All women received omalizumab during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Sixty-four percent of mothers had severe asthma, 33.5% had moderate asthma, and 2.4% had mild asthma.

Overall, 15.2% of infants had confirmed congenital anomalies, and 6.2% had a major birth defect. Fourteen percent of infants were premature, and of these, 12.5% were considered small for gestational age.

Jennifer Namazy

Jennifer A. Namazy

Birth weight data was available for 140 infants. Of these, 11.4% were considered small for gestational age, and 2.9% had low birth weight.

Analysis did not indicate any patterns of anomalies, according to researchers.

“Given the small sample size and severity of maternal asthma, these pregnancy outcomes are not inconsistent with previous observations,” study researcher Jennifer A. Namazy, MD, FAAAAI, of Scripps Clinic Medical Group in San Diego, and colleagues concluded.

Reference:

Namazy JA, et al. Abstract 1. Presented at: the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting; Feb. 20-24, 2015; Houston.

Disclosure: Infectious Diseases in Children was unable to confirm financial disclosures.