American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

Source:

Millican C, et al. Paper 624. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. March 22-26, 2022; Chicago.

Disclosures: Murrell reports being a paid consultant for and received research support from Smith & Nephew.
April 08, 2022
1 min read
Save

Stiff shoulders after rotator cuff repair may be less likely to require revision surgery

Source:

Millican C, et al. Paper 624. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. March 22-26, 2022; Chicago.

Disclosures: Murrell reports being a paid consultant for and received research support from Smith & Nephew.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

CHICAGO — Patients with stiff shoulders after rotator cuff repair were more likely to be satisfied with their repair and less likely to require revision surgery than patients without stiff shoulders, according to results presented here.

George A. C. Murrell, MD, and colleagues compared range of motion, shoulder function, shoulder strength and rotator cuff integrity using ultrasound between patients with and patients without stiff shoulders who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients were matched for calendar year of surgery.

“For each year, we divided patients into the lower 15th percentile, in terms of external rotation, vs. the upper 15th percentile, in terms of external rotation, to give us a stiff group and a non-stiff group with a minimum of 2 years follow-up,” Murrell said in his presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

George A. C. Murrell
George A. C. Murrell

At 6 months postoperatively, Murrell noted patients in the stiff shoulder group had a retear rate of less than 3% vs. a 20% retear rate in the non-stiff shoulder group.

“As we followed them out, those differences continued much the same with the stiff group being better than the non-stiff group at long-term follow-up,” Murrell said.

Results showed postoperative stiffness resolved 5 years after surgery for all measurements except external rotation. Murrell noted patients in the stiff shoulder group had a less than 5% chance of undergoing revision surgery compared with patients in the non-stiff shoulder group who had greater than a 20% chance of undergoing revision surgery.

“I think the most important data here is, in the longer-term, patients ranked overall shoulder satisfaction [and] the group that had early stiffness ranked their shoulders better than the group that didn’t have the stiffness at 6 weeks,” Murrell said.