Perspective from Per Kjaersgaard-Andersen, MD
Disclosures: Clausen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors relevant financial disclosures.
October 15, 2021
1 min read
Save

Low rate of patients with hip OA in education, exercise program received THR

Perspective from Per Kjaersgaard-Andersen, MD
Disclosures: Clausen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Published results showed a low rate of participants with symptomatic hip OA enrolled in a supervised education and exercise therapy program received a total hip replacement during the 2-year follow-up period.

Researchers assessed the rate of THR among 3,657 participants 45 years of age or older with hip OA who received supervised education and exercise therapy through the Good Life with Osteoarthritis in Denmark program from July 2014 to March 2017. Researchers included demographic and disease-specific baseline characteristics and measures of physical activity and quality of life as potential prognostic factors. Researchers retrieved information on THR from the Danish National Patient Registry and developed a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model.

Results showed 30% of participants received a THR within 2 years, and 60% of the 100 participants already wait-listed for THR had the procedure. Researchers found 14 of the 22 candidate prognostic factors were statistically significant for receiving THR. Male gender, having self-reported radiographic hip OA, being wait-listed for THR and having a higher pain intensity were factors associated with a faster rate of THR, according to results. However, researchers noted predictors of a slower rate of THR included faster walking speed, better hip-related quality of life and having three or more comorbidities.

“The variability in surgeons’ recommendations and practices is an essential contributor to the variability in clinical symptoms among hip participants receiving THR,” the authors wrote. “Thus, especially when THR is interpreted as a proxy for disease progression, it must be kept in mind that multiple factors inevitably influence the decision to perform surgery as well as the prognosis in general.”