American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting

American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting

Perspective from Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Source:

Bergum R, et al. Paper 42. Presented at: American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting. Sept.30 - Oct. 2, 2021; San Francisco (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Bergum reports no relevant financial disclosures.
October 06, 2021
1 min read
Save

In-office ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release mitigates need for conversions

Perspective from Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Source:

Bergum R, et al. Paper 42. Presented at: American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting. Sept.30 - Oct. 2, 2021; San Francisco (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Bergum reports no relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

In-office ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release is associated with no need for added sedation or analgesia, or conversion to mini-open carpal tunnel release, a speaker said at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meeting.

Surgeons treated 106 hands in 76 patients with a mean age of 65 years; 83% of hands had one or more comorbidities. In addition, they treated 55 hands in 28 patients as part of simultaneous bilateral procedures performed during the study period of March 2019 to March 2020.

“All patients tolerated the procedure in the office,” Russell Bergum, DO, of the Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea, Minnesota, said. He noted one patient developed complex regional pain syndrome-like pain at 2 weeks postoperatively, which resolved within about 4 weeks.

“There were no other postoperative complications and no recurrences or reoperations within the 1-year follow-up period,” he said.

Patients completed Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaires (BCTQ) and quick DASH (qDASH) at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months and 1 year postoperatively. Clinical results based on recovery curves for the BCTQ and qDASH showed these scores improved significantly “as early as 2 weeks, which persists at 1 year,” Bergum said.

Furthermore, based on the recovery results, both sets of scores showed statistically significant improvement at all postoperative timepoints compared with preoperative levels, according to Bergum.

“Carpal tunnel release using ultrasound guidance was well tolerated, safe and effective and resulted in rapid clinical improvements that were durable at 1-year follow-up, including patients with moderately severe or severe disease, or patients treated with simultaneous bilateral procedures,” he said.

None of the patients were prescribed splinting or physical therapy postoperatively.