North American Spine Society Annual Meeting

North American Spine Society Annual Meeting

Source:

Verma K, et al. Paper 01. Presented at: North American Spine Social Annual Meeting. Sept. 29 - Oct. 2, 2021; Boston (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Verma reports no relevant financial disclosures.
September 30, 2021
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Prolonged rest may increase length of stay, complications after incidental durotomy

Source:

Verma K, et al. Paper 01. Presented at: North American Spine Social Annual Meeting. Sept. 29 - Oct. 2, 2021; Boston (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Verma reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Prolonged rest for more than 24 hours after incidental durotomy led to increased length of hospital stay and increased medical and wound complications compared with immediate mobilization, according to results presented here.

Ketan Verma, MD, and colleagues categorized 361 patients who underwent incidental durotomy between January 2010 and November 2020 into two groups based on whether they were immediately mobilized (n=254) or required prolonged bed rest for more than 24 hours after surgery (n=107).

Results showed 15.9% of patients on prolonged bed rest had wound issues or infection compared with 8.7% of patients who were immediately mobilized. Data were derived from Verma K, et al. Paper 01. Presented at: North American Spine Society Annual Meeting. Sept. 29 – Oct. 2, 2021; Boston (hybrid meeting).
Results showed 15.9% of patients on prolonged bed rest had wound issues or infection compared with 8.7% of patients who were immediately mobilized. Data were derived from Verma K, et al. Paper 01. Presented at: North American Spine Society Annual Meeting. Sept. 29 – Oct. 2, 2021; Boston (hybrid meeting).

Verma noted patients on prolonged bed rest spent a significantly longer time in the hospital. When categorized based on whether the patient underwent a discectomy, laminectomy or decompression and fusion, the statistical difference remained, with a longer hospital stay associated with patients on prolonged bed rest, according to Verma.

Ketan Verma
Ketan Verma

“Comparing all of the medical issues, what we found in the group that was kept flat for greater than 24 hours after a primarily repaired durotomy, there was a higher chance of those patients having an ileus or urinary retention, [urinary tract infections] UTIs, pulmonary issues and confusion,” Verma said in his presentation at the North American Spine Society Annual Meeting. “[Deep vein thrombosis] DVT was the only group where there was no statistical difference between the two groups.”

He added 15.9% of patients on prolonged bed rest had wound issues or infection compared with 8.7% of patients who were immediately mobilized.

“The thought that if you keep someone flat it would prevent you from revision surgery or the other way around, if you immediately mobilize a patient that could result in a revision surgery, was not necessarily found to be true,” Verma said. “There was no statistical difference between the two groups – immediate mobilization vs. flat – for greater than 24 hours in terms of reoperation rate.”