American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

Source:

Zinger G, et al. Paper 705. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. Aug. 31 - Sept. 3, 2021; San Diego.

Disclosures: Zinger reports no relevant financial disclosures.
September 14, 2021
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Hyaluronic acid injection for chronic tennis elbow may relieve pain, improve function

Source:

Zinger G, et al. Paper 705. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. Aug. 31 - Sept. 3, 2021; San Diego.

Disclosures: Zinger reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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SAN DIEGO — Results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting showed hyaluronic acid injection may effectively relieve pain and improve function in patients with chronic tennis elbow.

Gershon Zinger, MD, MS, and colleagues randomly assigned patients with chronic tennis elbow to receive either an injection of hyaluronic acid or saline. Researchers collected VAS pain scores, patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation and QuickDASH scores at 3, 6 and 12 months after injection.

“The biggest problem with the research was the follow-up for the saline group,” Zinger, of Shaare Zedek Medical Center and faculty of medicine at Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, told Healio Orthopedics. Zinger said fewer patients in the group came at each follow-up visit and that by 12 months, only 40% of patients were left in that group. “We decided we could not use it as a comparator. It was just completely unreliable.”

Gershon Zinger
Gershon Zinger

Zinger noted patients who received hyaluronic acid injections experienced significant improvements in VAS pain scores, patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation and QuickDASH scores.

“Each patient on their own also improved,” Zinger said. “Of the 18 patients enrolled, one was lost before his first evaluation and the other 17 were followed for the full year. All 17 did well. In other words, there was not one failure, which I did not expect.”