American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting

Source:

Forlenza E, et al. Paper 060. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. Aug. 31-Sept. 3, 2021; San Diego.

Disclosures: Forsythe reports no relevant financial disclosures.
September 14, 2021
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Arthroscopic distal clavicle excision may reduce complication rates vs open excision

Source:

Forlenza E, et al. Paper 060. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting. Aug. 31-Sept. 3, 2021; San Diego.

Disclosures: Forsythe reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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SAN DIEGO — Arthroscopic distal clavicle excision for treatment of acromioclavicular joint pathology may decrease the rate of complications compared with open distal clavicle excision, according to results presented here.

Brian Forsythe, MD, and colleagues stratified patients with acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis to two groups based on whether they underwent open or arthroscopic distal clavicle excision from 2007 to 2017. Researchers compared the complication rates that occurred within 90 days and revision rates between the two groups.

“What we found was that arthroscopic procedures were being performed with an increasing frequency vs. open procedures, with an increase from 54% in 2007 to 70% of procedures in 2017,” Forsythe, associate professor at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, told Healio Orthopedics about results presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

Brian Forsythe
Brian Forsythe

Patients who underwent open distal clavicle excision had a greater incidence of surgical site infection, wound issues, hematoma and the need for transfusion, according to Forsythe.

“We also found that there were risk factors, which you could identify before surgery, which predisposed [patients] to complications and those were diabetes, heart disease, tobacco use, chronic kidney disease and female gender,” Forsythe said.

He added undergoing an open distal clavicle excision was also an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. Forsythe noted no significant differences between the two groups in terms of revision rate and cost.

“Our study suggests that doing a more minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure can result in similar outcomes, as reflected by an equivalent revision rate, and also results in a lower likelihood of complications,” Forsythe said.