American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting

Source:

Hurley ET, et al. Arthroscopic Bankart repair for primary versus recurrent instability in athletes. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America Combined Meeting; July 7-11, 2021; Nashville, Tennessee.

Disclosures: Hurley reports no relevant financial disclosures.
July 14, 2021
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Arthroscopic Bankart repair yields excellent outcomes for primary, recurrent instability

Source:

Hurley ET, et al. Arthroscopic Bankart repair for primary versus recurrent instability in athletes. Presented at: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America Combined Meeting; July 7-11, 2021; Nashville, Tennessee.

Disclosures: Hurley reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Arthroscopic Bankart repair has high return to play rates, excellent clinical outcome scores and low recurrence rates for athletes with primary or recurrent shoulder instability, according to a presenter.

“While [arthroscopic] Bankart repair (ABR) is the most commonly performed procedure [for anterior shoulder instability], it is unclear how recurrent instability impacts athletes trying to get back to sport,” Eoghan T. Hurley, MB, BCh, MCh, a research fellow at the Sports Surgery Clinic in Dublin, said during his presentation at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America Combined Meeting.

Hurley and colleagues retrospectively reviewed data on two matched cohorts: a cohort of 100 patients who underwent ABR for primary instability and a cohort of 100 patients who underwent ABR for recurrent instability. Outcome measures included return to play (RTP), recurrent instability, shoulder instability-return to Sport after Injury (SIRSI) score, VAS pain score and patient satisfaction.

Eoghan T. Hurley
Eoghan T. Hurley

Researchers found the primary instability cohort had a RTP rate of 80% (n = 80) and a SIRSI score of 64.9, while the recurrent instability cohort had a RTP rate of 79% (n = 79) and a SIRSI score of 61.4. VAS pain scores and patient satisfaction were also similar among the cohorts. Additionally, the primary instability cohort had a recurrent instability rate of 10% and the recurrent instability cohort a had a recurrent instability rate of 16%.

Despite similar clinical outcomes, Hurley noted the recurrent instability cohort managed to RTP “significantly faster” than the primary instability cohort.