Disclosures: Bartels reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
April 06, 2021
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Revision RSA was ‘not universally successful’ for anatomical glenoid component loosening

Disclosures: Bartels reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Despite pain reduction and functional improvements, revision reverse shoulder arthroplasty to treat the loosening of an anatomical polyethylene glenoid component was “not universally successful,” according to published results.

Douglas W. Bartels, MD, and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., analyzed 127 patients who underwent revision RSA for loosening anatomical polyethylene glenoid components from 2010 to 2017.

Revision RSA resulted in improvements in pain reduction, range of motion and functionality. However, Bartels and colleagues found 17% of all patients had a glenoid mechanical failure. The researchers also noted a 20% reoperation rate among the cohort.

“Loosening of anatomical glenoid components remains a difcult problem to treat,” Bartels and colleagues wrote. “Although this procedure resulted in improvements in terms of pain and function, it was not universally successful and thus needs further renement in order to improve outcomes,” they concluded.