Disclosures: Jensen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
April 05, 2021
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UKA led to shorter stay, fewer periprosthetic infections and reoperations than TKA

Disclosures: Jensen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Compared with total knee arthroplasty, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty yielded shorter hospital stays, more day-of discharges, fewer periprosthetic joint infections and fewer reoperations, according to published results.

Investigators at Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre in Denmark analyzed a propensity-score-matched cohort of 2,786 patients who underwent UKA and 7,708 patients who underwent TKA in a fast-track setting from 2010 to 2017. Outcome measures included length of stay, readmissions and complications, according to the study.

Jensen graphic
The UKA group experienced shorter median length of stay and same-day discharge rates, overall. Data were derived from Jensen CB, et al. J Bone Joint Surg. 2021;doi:10.2106/JBJS.20.01287.

After performing univariate, multivariate and chi-square test analyses, researchers found the UKA group had a median length of stay of 1 day, with 21.1% of patients likely to be discharged on the same day of surgery. In comparison, the TKA group had a median length of stay of 2 days, with 0.5% of patients likely be discharged on the same day of surgery.

Researchers also noted the UKA group had fewer periprosthetic joint infections (OR = 0.50) and reoperations (OR = 0.40), but more aseptic revisions (OR = 2.5) compared with the TKA group. Investigators also found no differences in overall 90-day complication rates between the cohorts.

“In our large, detailed, multicenter investigation of fast-track knee arthroplasties, patients who underwent UKA were hospitalized for an average of 1.1 fewer days compared with the TKA group. The UKA group was also found to be more likely to be discharged on the day of surgery while being less likely to have an LOS of greater than 2 or 4 days,” the researchers wrote in the study. “Our ndings support the use of UKA in a fast-track setup when indicated,” they added.