Perspective from Rachel M. Frank, MD
Source:

Anz AW, et al. Paper 13. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day; March 17 and 18, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Anz reports he received educational and research support, consulting fees and speaking fees from Arthrex, and consulting fees from Bioventus.
March 24, 2021
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Platelet-rich plasma injection for knee OA had similar outcomes vs bone marrow aspirate

Perspective from Rachel M. Frank, MD
Source:

Anz AW, et al. Paper 13. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day; March 17 and 18, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Anz reports he received educational and research support, consulting fees and speaking fees from Arthrex, and consulting fees from Bioventus.
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Platelet-rich plasma and concentrated bone marrow aspirate injections had similar outcomes for treatment of knee osteoarthritis at 24-month follow-up, according to results.

Adam W. Anz, MD, and colleagues randomly assigned 90 patients with knee OA to receive either platelet-rich plasma (n=41) or concentrated bone marrow aspirate (n=49) injection.

“One [patient] was withdrawn at the 12-month time point from the platelet-rich plasma group and four from the bone marrow aspirate group,” Anz said in his presentation at the Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day. “At the final time point, we had lost 11 [patients] within the platelet-rich plasma group and nine within the concentrated bone marrow aspirate group.”

Adam W. Anz
Adam W. Anz

Anz noted significant improvements in IKDC and WOMAC scores at 1-month follow-up. These scores continued to improve until 3-month follow-up when the scores plateaued and were sustained until the 24-month final follow-up, according to Anz.

“At the final follow-up, IKDC scores had improved 37% higher from baseline in the concentrated bone marrow aspirate group and 34% from baseline in the platelet-rich plasma group,” Anz said.

He added WOMAC scores improved 41% and 38% from baseline to final follow-up in the concentrated bone marrow aspirate and platelet-rich plasma groups, respectively.

“These improvements exceeded previously reported minimally detectable changes for both the IKDC and WOMAC, and there were no differences between the platelet-rich plasma and the concentrated bone marrow aspirate groups,” Anz said.