Perspective from Christopher M. Larson, MD
Source:

Carreira DS, et al. Paper 16. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day; March 17 and 18, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Carreira reports he receives consulting fees from Biomet and ConMed, and research support from Arthrex.
March 25, 2021
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Labral degeneration prior to hip arthroscopy yielded worse functional outcomes

Perspective from Christopher M. Larson, MD
Source:

Carreira DS, et al. Paper 16. Presented at: Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day; March 17 and 18, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Carreira reports he receives consulting fees from Biomet and ConMed, and research support from Arthrex.
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Patients with greater than 50% labral degeneration prior to hip arthroscopy had worse hip specific functional outcomes at a minimum 2-year follow-up, according to results.

In this multicenter study, Dominic S. Carreira, MD, and colleagues categorized 613 patients into groups based on whether they had less than 50% labral degeneration (n=473; control group) or greater than 50% labral degeneration (labral degeneration group; n=140) prior to arthroscopic hip surgery. At a minimum 2-year follow-up, researchers collected International Hip Outcome Tool-12 (iHOT-12) scores, as well as minimal clinically important difference, substantial clinical benefit and patient-acceptable symptom state (PASS).

In his presentation at the Arthroscopy Association of North America and American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Specialty Day, Carreira noted patients with labral degeneration had worse baseline scores, with a preoperative iHOT-12 score of 33 vs. 37 in the control group. The groups also had significant differences in 2-year iHOT-12 outcome scores, as well as significant differences in minimal clinically important difference of 10%, PASS of 16% and substantial clinical benefit of 16%, according to Carreira.

When acetabular cartilage damage was reviewed as a possible confounder, Carreira said investigators found some degree of acetabular cartilage damage documented in about half of the study group for both patients in the degenerated and control group.

“In looking at our results, we also did a logistic regression model controlling for baseline iHOT-12, age, BMI and gender, and labral degeneration was found to be an independent negative predictor of achieving all clinical significant thresholds as a difference,” Carreira said in his presentation. “This is noted with odds ratios in minimal clinical important difference, PASS and, again, substantial clinical benefit.”