Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting

Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting

Source:

Baird S, et al. Podium presentation 0075. Presented at: Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting; Feb. 12-16, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Baird reports no relevant financial disclosures.
March 10, 2021
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Osteotomy techniques uniquely change acetabular coverage, volume after hip dysplasia

Source:

Baird S, et al. Podium presentation 0075. Presented at: Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting; Feb. 12-16, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Baird reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Both re-directional and incomplete osteotomy techniques uniquely change acetabular coverage and volume when used for correction of acetabular dysplasia of the hip, according to recently presented results.

“Comparative analysis of different osteotomies is usually limited due to large variations in dysplasia and the fact that each patient only gets one osteotomy,” Samuel Baird, BS, said in his presentation at the Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting. “However, 3D-printing technologies enable the use of patient-specific anatomic models in mock surgery for comparative analysis of different osteotomies.”

Baird graphic
The Mock Salter technique resulted in “significantly less” acetabular volume change compared with the Pemberton, Dega and San Diego osteotomies. Data were derived from Baird S, et al. Podium presentation 0075. Presented at: Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting; Feb. 12-16, 2021 (virtual meeting).

To evaluate differences in acetabular coverage angles and volume between a re-directional osteotomies, such as the Mock Salter, and incomplete osteotomies, such as the Pemberton, Dega and San Diego, Baird and colleagues from the Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego and the University of California San Diego retrospectively analyzed 3D-printed mock pelvises of 14 patients (aged 3 to 7 years) with acetabular dysplasia.

In all cases, Baird and colleagues found a decrease in acetabular volume and unique change in postoperative mean coverage angles across several regions. However, the Salter technique resulted in “significantly less” acetabular volume change (-6%) compared with the Pemberton (-14%), Dega (-19%) and San Diego (-19%) osteotomies.

“This study re-demonstrated that each osteotomy used for correction of acetabular dysplasia uniquely changes acetabular coverage in different regions,” Baird concluded. “Importantly, these differences in volume changes and acetabular coverage between osteotomies should influence surgical planning to optimize patient-specific defects.”