Patellofemoral Update

Patellofemoral Update

Disclosures: Villa reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
March 05, 2021
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Study finds positive short-term results from second-generation patellofemoral arthroplasty

Disclosures: Villa reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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For patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis, second-generation onlay patellofemoral arthroplasty showed safe and acceptable results at short-term and midterm follow-up, according to published results.

To study the efficacy of second-generation (2G) onlay patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) for patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA), researchers performed a systematic review of 33 studies found in PubMed, Cohrane library, EMBASE and Google Scholar from 2005 to 2020.

Villa infographic
Villa and colleagues found implant survivorship at a minimum follow-up of 5 years was 94.24%. Data were derived from Villa JC, et al. J Arthroplasty. 2021;doi:10.1016/j.arth.2021.02.054.

Outcome measures included operative and nonoperative complications, required revision and/or conversion to total knee arthroplasty, and implant survivorship, according to the study.

Overall, researchers found 259 total studies on the topic. The mean age of patients was 59.7 years. Implant survivorship at a mean follow-up of 5.52 years was 87.72%; however, sub-analysis of studies with a minimum of 5 years follow-up revealed an implant survivorship of 94.24%.

Researchers also noted pain was the most common nonoperative complication and progression of PFOA was the most common operative complication. Additionally, revision was required for 1.37% of cases (n = 36), while conversion to TKA was required for 7.82% of cases (n = 205).

“This makes [PFA] an acceptable alternative to TKA or conservative measures in appropriately selected patients,” the researchers wrote in the study. “However, more extensive studies regarding functional outcomes need to be performed. In addition, future studies should be evaluated for long-term cost saving measures of performing a PFA [vs.] long-term conservative management in those patients who are too young to receive a TKA,” they concluded.