Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting
Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting
Perspective from Jerry Y. Du, MD
Source:

Tamayo KS, et al. Podium presentation 0085. Presented at: Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting; Feb. 12-16, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Tamayo reports no relevant financial disclosures.
March 01, 2021
1 min read
Save

Increased BMI associated with patellofemoral cartilage strain after acute, dynamic loading

Perspective from Jerry Y. Du, MD
Source:

Tamayo KS, et al. Podium presentation 0085. Presented at: Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting; Feb. 12-16, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Tamayo reports no relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Patients with an increased BMI exhibit increased patellar and trochlear cartilage strain after acute, dynamic loading, according to recently presented results.

“It has been shown that a common sequence in the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in symptomatic adults is altered in the patellofemoral joint with progression strongly related to the subsequent onset of tibiofemoral joint OA,” Krystal S. Tamayo said in her presentation at the Orthopaedic Research Society Annual Meeting.

Tamayo Graphic
Compared with the normal BMI group, the high BMI group experienced higher mean patellofemoral cartilage strain after acute, dynamic loading.

“Therefore, isolated, symptomatic patellofemoral joint OA may be a marker - even a target - for early management of knee OA,” she added.

To track patellofemoral cartilage changes in active, obese patients, Tamayo and colleagues at Duke University radiographically analyzed patellofemoral cartilage thickness of 15 subjects. Eight patients had normal BMI (between 18 kg/m2 and 25 kg/m2) and seven patients had high BMI (between 30 kg/m2 and 36 kg/m2), according to the study.

Tamayo and colleagues took radiographic measurements before and after exercise and compiled 3D mesh models to examine patellar and trochlear cartilage thickness and strain.

Researchers noted no interaction between BMI and bone; however, they observed a “significant main effect of BMI on mean patellofemoral cartilage strains” after 20 minutes of walking, Tamayo said. Mean patellofemoral cartilage strain was 1.7% in the normal BMI group and 5.4% in the high BMI group.

“In conclusion, increased BMI was associated with elevated in vivo patellofemoral cartilage strains following dynamic loading,” Tamayo said. “This may help elucidate the onset and progression of patellofemoral joint OA in obese individuals.”