Perspective from Aaron J. Krych, MD
Disclosures: This study received funding from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Smith & Nephew, National Football League Charities and Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation; and partially funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.
December 28, 2020
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Revision ACL reconstruction with meniscal repair had less than 10% failure rate at 2-years

Perspective from Aaron J. Krych, MD
Disclosures: This study received funding from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Smith & Nephew, National Football League Charities and Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation; and partially funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.
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Published results did not show a high failure rate among patients who underwent meniscal repair with revision ACL reconstruction at 2-year follow-up, with failure rates of less than 10% for medial and lateral repairs.

Rick W. Wright, MD, and colleagues in the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Group collected demographics, sports participation, injury mechanism, comorbidities and knee injury history among patients who underwent revision ACL reconstruction with concomitant meniscal repair between 2006 and 2011. Researchers also collected KOOS score, WOMAC Index, IKDC subjective form and the Marx Activity Rating Scale.

To determine whether any subsequent surgery had occurred to either knee since the initial revision ACL reconstruction, researchers obtained 2-year follow-up by phone and email, as well as operative reports of patients who underwent subsequent surgery to verify the pathologic condition and subsequent treatment.

Rick W. Wright
Rick W. Wright

Of the 1,205 revision ACL reconstructions included in the study, 18% of patients underwent concurrent meniscal repairs, including 153 medial, 48 lateral and 17 medial and lateral, according to the results. Researchers noted 76% of the repairs were performed with all-inside techniques.

Researchers obtained 2-year surgical follow-up among 90% of patients. At 2 years, researchers found patients had a meniscal repair failure rate of 8.6%. Results showed 15 of the 17 failures were medial and two were lateral, with four medial failures treated in conjunction with a subsequent repeat revision ACL reconstruction.

“These results in the MARS Group are generalizable to the sports medicine community with its 52 sites across the country, and 50/50 mix of private and academic surgeons,” Wright told Healio Orthopedics. “Surgeons and patients should pursue meniscal repair when indicated in the revision setting with expectations of excellent results.”