American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting

American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting

Perspective from Vani J. Sabesan, MD
Source:

Yow B, et al. Progression to glenohumeral arthritis after arthroscopic anterior stabilization in a young and high-demand population. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 2-3, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Dickens reports no relevant financial disclosures.
December 04, 2020
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Several factors increased risk of glenohumeral OA after arthroscopic Bankart repair

Perspective from Vani J. Sabesan, MD
Source:

Yow B, et al. Progression to glenohumeral arthritis after arthroscopic anterior stabilization in a young and high-demand population. Presented at: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting; Oct. 2-3, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Dickens reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Results from the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Annual Meeting showed risk factors for glenohumeral osteoarthritis after arthroscopic Bankart repair included patient age at index surgery, the number of anchors and revision surgery.

Jonathan F. Dickens, MD, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed postoperative imaging classification of OA, the number of anchors and the need for revision surgery among 287 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair.

“Glenohumeral OA was defined as the presence of any grade 1 to 4 OA determined by the Samilson and Prieto classification or no clinical and radiographic findings of OA on follow-up,” Dickens said in his presentation.

During the study period, 8% of shoulders developed glenohumeral OA, according to Dickens. He noted patents who developed glenohumeral OA were more likely to have an increased number of anchors. Dickens added 39% of patients with OA underwent revision surgery vs. 18% of patients without OA.

“We performed a Kaplan Meier survival curve [which was] used to examine the surgical features predictive of glenohumeral OA and then, based on this, developed a multivariate model of which revision surgery was the most predictive of future development of glenohumeral OA, with a hazard ratio of 2.83, followed by age and anchor number,” Dickens said.