Perspective from Nickolas Garbis, MD
Disclosures: Fu reports no relevant financial disclosures.
October 26, 2020
2 min read
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Delayed rotator cuff repair may increase risk of revision

Perspective from Nickolas Garbis, MD
Disclosures: Fu reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Patients who underwent delayed rotator cuff repair beyond 12 months of diagnosis had an increased risk of undergoing subsequent revision rotator cuff repair, according to results.

Michael C. Fu, MD, MHS, of Hospital for Special Surgery, and colleagues stratified 2,759 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair into an early (fewer than 6 weeks; 57.4%), routine (between 6 weeks and 12 months; 40%) or delayed (more than 12 months; 5.3%) repair cohorts. Researchers compared the rates of subsequent revision rotator cuff repair among the cohorts.

Results showed an overall revision rate of 9.6% at 5-year follow-up. Researchers found patients in the delayed group had a revision rate of 15.2% compared with 9.9% and 8.3% in the early and routine groups, respectively. Patients who underwent delayed repair had increased odds of revision surgery vs. routine repair, according to multivariate analysis. Researchers noted no association between risk of revision surgery with patient sex and Charlson Comorbidity Index, while patients older than 75 years of age had decreased odds of revision compared with patients younger than 75 years of age.

Michael C. Fu
Michael C. Fu

“For patients with symptomatic rotator cuff tears that have not responded to non-surgical treatment, rotator cuff repair within 12 months of diagnosis is associated with a decreased risk of needing subsequent revision surgery,” Fu told Healio Orthopedics. “These results will hopefully inspire continuing research into the biologic explanations for this finding and ways to improve our outcomes following rotator cuff repair.”