Perspective from Brett D. Owens, MD
Source:

Cameron KL, et al. Presentation 204865AA. Presented at: National Athletic Trainers Association Virtual Clinical Symposia and AT Expo; July 13-16, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Cameron reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
July 20, 2020
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Sport specialization in female military cadets led to higher risk of overuse injuries

Perspective from Brett D. Owens, MD
Source:

Cameron KL, et al. Presentation 204865AA. Presented at: National Athletic Trainers Association Virtual Clinical Symposia and AT Expo; July 13-16, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Cameron reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Higher levels of sports specialization prior to U.S. military service led to an increased risk of lower extremity stress fractures in female cadets, according to results presented at the NATA Virtual Clinical Symposia and AT Expo.

Kenneth L. Cameron, PhD, MPH, ATC, director of orthopedic and sports medicine research at Keller Army Hospital, and colleagues researched the relationship between level of sports specialization and lower extremity injury in 2,012 U.S. Service Academy cadets.

Researchers followed the cadets through their first year at the academy, collecting demographic data on sports specialization history, incidence of lower extremity stress fractures, as well as sex and odds ratios, according to the abstract.

Among all participants, 43.78% (881) reported low levels, 36.23% (729) reported moderate levels and 19.98% (402) reported high levels of sports specialization through high school. Thirty-four lower extremity stress fractures were reported through the 1-year follow-up – an overall incidence of 1.69%.

“Females were over five times more likely to experience an incident stress fracture (4.47%) when compared to males (0.84%),” Cameron and colleagues wrote in the abstract. “In univariate models, [female athletes] with moderate specialization were 2.49 times more likely to sustain an incident lower extremity stress fracture, and those with high specialization were 4.25 times more likely when compared to those with low specialization,” they added.