Opioid Resource Center
Opioid Resource Center
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Gandhi JS, et al. Poster 0718. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 24-28, 2020 (meeting canceled).

Disclosures: Gandhi reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
July 01, 2020
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‘Significant overall decline’ found in opioid prescription rates for pediatric patients

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Gandhi JS, et al. Poster 0718. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 24-28, 2020 (meeting canceled).

Disclosures: Gandhi reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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While regional and demographic differences remain, there has been a “significant overall decline” in opioid prescription rates for children and adolescents with minor fractures and dislocations, according to published results.

Jigar S. Gandhi, MD, and colleagues studied pediatric opioid prescription rates, taken from the Pediatric Health Information System database, from 2004 to 2017. The mean age of the 120,002 patients was 12 years and 70.5% of the patients were male.

Gandhi and colleagues found the national opioid prescription rate decreased from 60% in 2004 to 27.8% in 2017. Patients were also 75% less likely to be prescribed an opioid in 2017 vs. 2004, according to the abstract.

Pediatric patients with minor trauma injuries were 75% less likely to be prescribed an opioid in 2017 vs. 2004.
Pediatric patients with minor trauma injuries were 75% less likely to be prescribed an opioid in 2017 vs. 2004.

“While the opioid prescription rates in all four U.S. regions have reduced dramatically over the years, some regions responded more quickly,” Gandhi and colleagues wrote in abstract. “Although a significant regional variability still exists across the U.S., the overall improvement in practice is encouraging and could be a powerful part of prevention to end the crisis,” they added.