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Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
June 26, 2020
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Study: Hip arthroscopy is safe and effective in young patients

Source/Disclosures
Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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Hip arthroscopy is a safe and effective procedure for improving functional impairments in pediatric and adolescent patients, according to a published study.

“Although surgical indications for hip arthroscopy have been expanded to include some pediatric hip disorders, there still is a paucity of literature on the outcomes of hip arthroscopy in such conditions,” Chaemoon Lim, MD, of the division of pediatric orthopedics at Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, and colleagues wrote. “In this study, we aimed to investigate the safety and functional outcomes of hip arthroscopy in pediatric and adolescent hip disorders.”

In a retrospective review, information for 32 patients who underwent hip arthroscopic procedures from January 2010 to December 2016 were analyzed. According to the study, patients underwent the procedure for conditions such as Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, idiopathic femoroacetabular impingement, sequelae of septic arthritis of the hip, hereditary multiple exostosis, synovial giant cell tumor, idiopathic chondrolysis and post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Functional limitations, subjective pain and improvements after surgery were evaluated using the modified Harris hip score (mHHS), the WOMAC and VAS.

After a mean follow-up of 4.7 years, investigators found 85.3% of patients showed improvement in the mHHS (from 77.8 to 90), 85.3% of patients showed improvement in the WOMAC (from 16.4 to 6.8) and 88.2% of patients showed improvement in the VAS (from 4.4 to 2.2). Range of hip motion also improved from 101.7 to 115.0, with 97.1% of patients showing improvement. Investigators found no serious complications related to the procedure except for five patients who had transient numbness around the groin, which disappeared the day after surgery in all but one patient. That patient showed symptom recovery at follow-up on the seventh day after surgery.

“Hip arthroscopy is a safe procedure even in skeletally immature patients,” Lim and colleagues concluded. “It appears to be effective in improving functional impairment caused by femoroacetabular impingement between the deformed femoral head and acetabulum or some intra-articular focal problems in pediatric and adolescent hip disorders.”