Perspective from David M. Kalainov, MD, MBA
Source/Disclosures
Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
June 06, 2020
1 min read
Save

More pain catastrophizing before carpal tunnel release led to lower patient satisfaction

Perspective from David M. Kalainov, MD, MBA
Source/Disclosures
Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Patients with higher pain catastrophizing scores prior to carpal tunnel release experienced lower satisfaction at 12 months postoperatively, according to published results.

Researchers collected DASH scores, EuroQol-5D scores, pain catastrophizing scale scores and distal motor latency preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively among 417 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome treated with either open or endoscopic carpal tunnel release. Researchers used Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test to test for differences in preoperative and postoperative DASH and EQ-5D scores, and examined risk factors for low postoperative patient-reported satisfaction with stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis.

Preoperatively to 12 months postoperatively, results showed a general improvement in DASH and EQ-5D scores among patients. Patients with higher preoperative pain catastrophizing scale scores, lower EQ-5D and higher DASH scores reported low satisfaction at 12 months postoperatively, according to results. Researchers found a statistically significant effect of preoperative pain catastrophizing scale scores on patient-reported satisfaction in the fully adjusted multiple regression analysis. However, researchers noted no statistically significant predictive effect of preoperative EQ-5D, DASH, distal motor latency, age or gender.

“Higher preoperative [pain catastrophizing scale] PCS seems to have a negative effect on postoperative patient-reported satisfaction after [carpal tunnel release],” the authors wrote. “Further studies on patient satisfaction should include additional information on patient smoking habits, alcohol consumption, BMI, diabetes and income to strengthen the explanatory power.”