Perspective from Jacob Shapira, MD
Disclosures: Casartelli reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
June 02, 2020
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Hip arthroscopy, physical therapy may improve femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

Perspective from Jacob Shapira, MD
Disclosures: Casartelli reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Published results showed patients with femoroacetabular impingement had statistically and clinically significant short-term improvements in hip pain, function and quality of life when treated with either hip arthroscopy or physical therapy.

In a systematic database search, researchers identified three randomized controlled trials in which patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome received treatment with either hip arthroscopy or physical therapy. Researchers evaluated the international hip outcome tool–33 (iHot–33) score between 6 and 8 months after the interventions, and computed the pooled mean difference in iHOT-33 scores within and between the treatment arms using a random effects model.

Results showed significant increases in iHOT–33 from baseline to follow-up for both hip arthroscopy and physical therapy. Compared with physical therapy, researchers found significantly higher iHOT–33 scores at follow-up among patients who received hip arthroscopy.

“The superiority of hip arthroscopy as compared to physical therapy was statistically proven, but the clinical relevance of these findings remains unclear as the difference between the effects of hip arthroscopy and physical therapy may not be clinically detected by patients,” the authors wrote. “One of the main future research challenges is to identify which patients could best benefit from each of these interventions.”