April 05, 2020
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Benzoyl peroxide may reduce presence of C. acnes on the shoulder

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Published results showed use of benzoyl peroxide five times on the skin of the shoulder reduced the presence of Cutibacterium acnes and may reduce the risk of postoperative infections.

Researchers randomly assigned 30 healthy participants identified with C. acnes on the shoulder skin with baseline skin swabs to either a benzoyl peroxide group (BPO Teva hydrogel, Teva Nederland) or a placebo group (Carbomeerwatergel 1% FNA 100 g hydrogel, Fargon NL). Researchers instructed participants to apply the gel five times a day during 2.5 days before collecting another set of skin swabs to determine the presence of C. acnes.

Results showed a 51.4% reduction in the presence of C. acnes, with C. acnes identified in 20% of participants in the benzoyl peroxide group vs. 71.4% of participants in the placebo group after application. Researchers found gram-positive skin flora remained present in 11 of 15 participants in the benzoyl peroxide group and in 13 of 14 participants in the placebo group. After application, two participants in the benzoyl peroxide group and three participants in the placebo group had other bacteria present which were not detected at baseline, according to results.

Floor M. van Diek, MD, and colleagues found a 51.4% reduction in C. acnes on the shoulder with the use of benzoyl peroxide.
Floor M. van Diek, MD, and colleagues found a 51.4% reduction in C. acnes on the shoulder with the use of benzoyl peroxide.

“This relatively simple and inexpensive intervention can be added to current preventive methods,” the authors wrote. “To determine a reduction in postoperative shoulder infections, more [randomized controlled trials] RCTs with a long follow-up time to measure actual infection reductions in patients applying BPO and undergoing shoulder surgery are required.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.