American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting
Perspective from Thomas J. Barrett, MD
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Scott DF, et al. Poster 652. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 24-28, 2020 (meeting canceled).

April 22, 2020
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Medially stabilized TKA device had superior outcomes vs posterior-stabilized device

Perspective from Thomas J. Barrett, MD
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Scott DF, et al. Poster 652. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 24-28, 2020 (meeting canceled).

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Use of a medially stabilized implant system in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty yielded superior clinical outcomes compared with a posterior-stabilized implant system, according to results.

David F. Scott

David F. Scott, MD, and colleagues randomly assigned patients undergoing elective primary TKA to receive either a posterior-stabilized implant system (n=100) or a medially stabilized implant system (n=101). Researchers assessed and compared clinical and radiographic outcomes preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 6 months and annually postoperatively between the two groups.

Results showed patients in the posterior-stabilized device group had a 7.24% longer tourniquet time compared with the medially stabilized device group. Researchers found the medially stabilized device group had better 1- and 2-year postoperative forgotten joint scores, Knee Society Scores and flexion. At 2 years postoperatively, patients in the medially stabilized group had an average forgotten joint score of 70.06 and an average Knee Society Score of 182.97, according to results. This was compared with an average forgotten joint score of 57.87 and an average Knee Society Score of 170.91 in the posterior-stabilized group at 2 years, researchers noted. Results showed the medially stabilized group had an average maximum active flexion of 132.18° vs. 124.18° in the posterior-stabilized group. However, researchers found no differences between the two groups in alignment as measured in the coronal plane with long-standing radiographs both preoperatively and postoperatively.

“At the minimum 2-year follow-up for all 201 subjects in this study, the results demonstrate superiority of the medially stabilized device in terms of multiple clinical outcomes, including patient satisfaction as measured by the forgotten joint score and Knee Society Score, as well as substantially better range of motion,” Scott told Healio Orthopedics. “These findings support the use of a medially stabilized knee implant system and support the conclusion that this design, in conjunction with a modified kinematic alignment surgical technique, offers improved biomechanics and kinematics of that obtained with a [posterior-stabilized] PS knee implant.” – by Casey Tingle

 

Reference:

Scott DF, et al. Poster 652. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 24-28, 2020 (meeting canceled).

 

Disclosure: Scott reports he receives IP royalties from Innomed; is on the editorial or governing board for the Journal of Arthroplasty; is a paid consultant and paid presenter or speaker for Medacta International; and receives research support from Medacta International, Microport, OMNI LifeScience and Stryker.