Patellofemoral Update

Patellofemoral Update

Issue: April 2020
Disclosures: Fick reports he received funding support through the NIH Medical Research Scholars Program and contributions from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Genentech and the American Association for Dental Research.
March 05, 2020
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Patellofemoral morphology linked with maltracking in adolescents with patellofemoral pain

Issue: April 2020
Disclosures: Fick reports he received funding support through the NIH Medical Research Scholars Program and contributions from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Genentech and the American Association for Dental Research.
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Researchers of this study found patellofemoral morphology was altered and had an impact on maltracking in adolescents with patellofemoral pain.

Researchers used 3D MRIs from a previous study to measure patellar width, trochlear width, lateral patellar width, trochlea and patella depth, Wiberg index, patellar-height ratio, lateral trochlear inclination, cartilage length and lateral femoral shaft length. Shape parameters between adolescents with patellofemoral and control patients were also compared. The relationship between morphology, kinematics and pain were assessed with Pearson correlations and stepwise linear regression models.

Results showed adolescents with patellofemoral pain compared with controls had larger sulci (6.6 mm vs. 6 mm), lateral patellar width (23.1 mm vs. 21.4 mm) and patellar-trochlear width ratio (1.2 mm vs. 1.1 mm). In both adolescents with patellofemoral pain and controls and in the entire population, shape was associated with kinematics. Wiberg index, lateral shaft length and patellar-height ratio were correlated with medial shift in adolescents with patellofemoral pain. Patellar-height ratio and lateral patellar tilt were moderately correlated.

In adolescents with patellofemoral pain, half of the variation in patellar shift was due to the patellar-height ratio and Wiberg index, according to researchers. There were no linear correlations found with pain. – by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosure: Fick reports he received funding support through the NIH Medical Research Scholars Program and contributions from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Genentech and the American Association for Dental Research.