Perspective from Miho J. Tanaka, MD
Source:

Himestra LA, et al. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2019;doi:10.1007/s00167-019-05489-0.

April 08, 2019
2 min read
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Generalized joint hypermobility does not affect clinical outcomes after MPFL reconstruction

Perspective from Miho J. Tanaka, MD
Source:

Himestra LA, et al. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2019;doi:10.1007/s00167-019-05489-0.

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Generalized joint hypermobility did not impact disease-specific quality of life, physical symptom scores or functional outcomes after medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, according to recently published results.

“Although generalized joint hypermobility has long been associated with patellofemoral instability, it is unclear how hypermobility affects clinical outcomes after stabilization,” Laurie A. Hiemstra, MD, told Healio.com/Orthopedics. “In this large cohort of patients with an isolated [medial patellofemoral ligament]MPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellofemoral instability, it was demonstrated that the presence of hypermobility did not influence clinical results as measured by quality of life scores.”

From 2009 to 2014, Hiemstra and colleagues collected data on 174 knees after an isolated MPFL reconstruction. Investigators noted that if patients had a Beighton score of 4 or higher, they were categorized as being positive for generalized joint hypermobility. If they had a score of 3 or lower, they were classified as negative for the condition. Preoperative and postoperative Banff Patella Instability Instrument scores were compared and used to determine the impact of generalized joint hypermobility on quality of life. At 1-year and 2-years postoperatively, functional tests which included balance and single-leg hop testing were performed. Investigators calculated limb symmetry and limb-to-limb performance differences.

Of the 174 knees assessed, 55.1% had a positive Beighton score. Investigators reported seven surgical failures. No evidence was found on the association between a positive Beighton score and preoperative and postoperative Banff Patella Instability Instrument scores. There was no significant association between generalized joint hypermobility and postoperative functional testing measures. An inverse association was seen between a positive Beighton score and patient age, and a positive Beighton score was more prevalent in women. – by Monica Jaramillo

Disclosures: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.