August 27, 2014
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TKA provides excellent outcomes after lower-extremity amputation

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Although total knee arthroplasty is rare after lower-extremity amputation, it can provide excellent functional and clinical outcomes, according to study results.

Researchers reviewed 13 primary total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in 12 patients with prior lower-extremity amputation, among which 12 TKAs were performed on the contralateral side of the amputated limb and one was performed on the ipsilateral side. Using clinical examinations and patient surveys, the researchers calculated preoperative and postoperative Knee Society scores. The study’s primary endpoint was failure, which was defined as revision for any reason. Average clinical follow-up occurred at 6.8 years.

The researchers observed improvement in Knee Society scores from 30.4 preoperatively to 88.5 following TKA with a prior contralateral amputation.

At final follow-up, radiographic evidence of aseptic loosening of the tibial components was observed in 23.1% of patients, and the researchers recommended augmentation of tibial fixation with a stem during TKA after contralateral amputation.

Disclosures: See the study for a full list of all authors’ relevant financial disclosures.