Issue: Issue 4 2012
Perspective from Matthias Steinwachs, MD
Source:

Ebert JR. Am J Sports Med. 2012. doi: 10.1177/0363546512445167

July 24, 2012
1 min read
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Accelerated approach to postoperative weightbearing safe, effective for patients who receive MACI

Issue: Issue 4 2012
Perspective from Matthias Steinwachs, MD
Source:

Ebert JR. Am J Sports Med. 2012. doi: 10.1177/0363546512445167

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Researchers have detailed a safe, effective accelerated rehabilitation protocol for patients who undergo matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation, according to this study.

The researchers studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of 63 patients who underwent matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) in the medial or lateral femoral condyle. Patients received either an accelerated (31 patients) or traditional (32 patients) program with regard to postoperative weightbearing rehabilitation.

The accelerated protocol, according to the study abstract, involved patients reaching full weightbearing 8 weeks postoperatively. Patients in the traditional program reached full weightbearing 11 weeks postoperatively. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), 6-minute walk test and knee range of motion were assessed preoperatively and at the 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-month postoperative marks, as well as 5 years.

According to the study results, VAS results revealed less frequent pain at the 5-year mark for patients in the accelerated group, with no other significant VAS differences between the accelerated and traditional groups. The sport and recreation subscale of KOOS revealed significant improvements in both groups between the 24-month and 5-year marks, as well as a decrease in active knee extension for the traditional group.

Further, the authors found no differences in MRI-based scores between the 24-month and 5-year marks.

“At 5 years after surgery, 94% and 95% were satisfied with the ability of MACI to relieve their knee pain and improve their ability to undertake daily activities, respectively,” the authors wrote.