Issue: August 2012
Perspective from Javad Parvizi, MD
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Abbasi-Bafghi H. BMC Musculoskel Dis. 2012. doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-13-66.

July 13, 2012
1 min read
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Meta-analysis finds initial walking speed positively impacted by knee arthroplasty

Issue: August 2012
Perspective from Javad Parvizi, MD
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Abbasi-Bafghi H. BMC Musculoskel Dis. 2012. doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-13-66.

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Knee arthroplasty helped increase patients’ walking speed at 6 months to 60 months postoperatively, according to a study conducted by researchers in The Netherlands.

“Test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty,” the authors wrote in the study abstract. “The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects.”

For the analysis, the authors looked through 16 independent comparisons of preoperative and postoperative walking speed for patients who underwent knee arthroplasty. They identified 12 studies in their survey of Medline, Web of Science, and PEDro, for a total of 419 patients.

The authors wrote, “For 0.5 months to 5 months postoperatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6 months to 12 months and 13 months to 60 months postoperatively, heterogeneity was absent, low or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations).”

During the 6-month to 12-month and the 13-month to 60-month periods, patients in the study experienced an average speed increase of 0.8 standard deviations. Further analysis, however, suggested initial improvements in speed would be followed by a decline, the authors noted.