ARVO

ARVO

Source:

Chew EY. The results of the 10 year follow-on study of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2). Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (virtual meeting); May 1-7, 2021.

Disclosures: Chew reports no relevant financial disclosures.
June 10, 2021
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Lutein-zeaxanthin shows continued benefit in AREDS2 supplement for AMD

Source:

Chew EY. The results of the 10 year follow-on study of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2). Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (virtual meeting); May 1-7, 2021.

Disclosures: Chew reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Data from a 10-year follow-up study of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 reaffirmed the safety and benefit of replacing beta-carotene with lutein-zeaxanthin in the original AREDS supplement, according to a presenter at the virtual Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting.

“Patients who should be taking the AREDS formulation are those with intermediate AMD or those with late AMD in one eye,” Emily Y. Chew, MD, said during her presentation. “It is not recommended for smokers, as beta-carotene increased the risk for lung disease among smokers in two NIH studies.”

The AREDS2 study, conducted between 2006 and 2012, was designed to assess the effects of adding lutein-zeaxanthin and omega-3 fatty acids to the AREDS formulation on AMD outcomes.

Results showed a twofold increased risk for lung cancer among randomized patients who received the standard AREDS formulation that contained beta-carotene, whereas those who received AREDS with lutein-zeaxanthin showed incremental benefits in reduced progression to late AMD.

“Safety concerns of beta-carotene led to replacement of beta-carotene with lutein-zeaxanthin in the AREDS formulation,” Chew said.

For the follow-up study, Chew and colleagues placed six monthly telephone calls to AREDS2 participants. At 10 years, the researchers found that the addition of lutein-zeaxanthin had a significant beneficial effect for reducing progression to late AMD (P = .04) compared with the main effects of omega-3 fatty acids, low zinc and low beta-carotene (P .5).

Additionally, patients randomized to receive lutein-zeaxanthin had a lower risk for developing lung cancer (P = .35) compared with those who received beta-carotene (P = .02).

“Incremental beneficial effects of lutein-zeaxanthin in the efficacy of AREDS2 supplements continues when comparing lutein-zeaxanthin with beta-carotene in the follow-on, especially for neovascular AMD,” Chew said. “We look forward to presenting the data collected in our in-clinic exams in other ARVO presentations.”