Perspective from Mark Eltis, OD, FAAO
Disclosures: Yang reported no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ disclosures.
January 06, 2021
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IOP monitoring with contact lens sensors can help assess risk for glaucoma progression

Perspective from Mark Eltis, OD, FAAO
Disclosures: Yang reported no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for all other authors’ disclosures.
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Contact lens sensors that recorded ocular dimensional changes among patients with primary open-angle glaucoma are useful to identify risk for progression, according to research published in the Journal of Glaucoma.

“Clinical assessment of IOP is usually performed as a single measurement with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) during office-hour visits,” Zhiyong Yang, MD, PhD, and colleagues wrote. “A major limitation of GAT-based IOP assessment is that IOP-related information that describes its dynamic nature is missing and not utilized in glaucoma management.

“The purpose of the current study was to determine whether 24-hour [contact lens sensor (CLS)] recording of changes in IOP-related ocular dimensions correlated with the rate of visual field progression and whether associations found in previous studies could be confirmed.”

Yang and colleagues conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study. They analyzed data from 32 patients (mean age, 69.8 years; mean IOP, 17.8 mmHg) with primary open-angle glaucoma who participated in the Glaucoma Clinic and Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma study conducted by researchers at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center. The mean follow-up time was 9.9 years.

Mean deviation progression was –0.2 dB per year, with 26 eyes progressing less than 0.5 dB per year, and six eyes progressing greater than 0.5 dB per year. A 10-unit nocturnal variability of ocular dimension changes related to IOP correlated with faster visual field loss by –0.25 dB (P = .035).

“In conclusion, we found that some CLS parameters related to larger nocturnal variability of IOP-related ocular dimensional changes may correlate with faster glaucoma progression,” Yang and colleagues wrote. “Our findings suggest that ambulatory CLS monitoring may enhance risk stratification in clinical decision-making for glaucoma management.”