Source/Disclosures
Source:

Ho AC, et al. Real-World Performance of a Self-Operated Home Monitoring System for Early Detection of Choroidal Neovascularization in AMD (ForeseeHome Device). Presented at: American Society of Retina Specialists annual meeting; July 24-26, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Ho reports receiving consulting fees from Notal Vision. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
September 08, 2020
2 min read
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At-home system may help detect AMD symptoms

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Ho AC, et al. Real-World Performance of a Self-Operated Home Monitoring System for Early Detection of Choroidal Neovascularization in AMD (ForeseeHome Device). Presented at: American Society of Retina Specialists annual meeting; July 24-26, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Ho reports receiving consulting fees from Notal Vision. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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The use of a home monitoring system may prove beneficial in detecting the early symptoms of age-related macular degeneration, according to findings presented at the virtual American Society of Retina Specialists meeting.

Allen C. Ho, MD, and colleagues analyzed real-world performance of a self-operated home monitoring system for early detection of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in AMD.

“Visual acuity at the time of diagnosis of wet AMD is the best predictor of visual outcomes in the anti-VEGF era,” Ho, a professor of ophthalmology at Thomas Jefferson University, and the director of retina research at Will Eye Hospital, said during the presentation. “That is, if you start early with good vision, patients do better over time.”

The researchers examined data from a retrospective review of patients with dry AMD participating in the ForeseeHome (FSH) device monitoring program between November 2009 and September 2018.

Investigators documented development of CNV in one or both eyes among program participants. They compared data at the time of the CNV event, such as modality of CNV diagnosis and visual acuity, with data from the HOME study and the IRIS registry.

Ho and colleagues reported that they detected 69% of the 302 CNV events recorded from monitored patients after device alert.

For all eyes with known visual acuity, baseline visual acuity was 20/25-2 and 20/32-2 at event, researchers wrote. For eyes with events detected with the FSH, baseline visual acuity was 20/32+2 and 20/40+2 at event.

Visual acuity change was similar when events were detected by other means such as symptoms and office visits, with a median visual acuity loss of four letters, the researchers wrote. The percentage of all eyes with a baseline visual acuity greater than or equal to 20/40 retaining greater than or equal to 20/40 vision at the time of the event was 80%, 82% for eyes detected with the FSH and 74% detected by other means.

Data were comparable to the HOME study, where 64.1% of CNV events were detected after FSH, with a baseline visual acuity of 20/40+2, which was a median visual acuity loss of three letters, and 91% of eyes maintained a visual acuity of greater than or equal to 20/40, Ho and colleagues wrote. The data were substantially better than real-world IRIS registry data where the reported CNV event is 20/80 with only 33% of eyes maintaining visual acuity greater than or equal to 20/40.

“Because baseline vision is the most important determinant of long-term vision in this anti-VEGF era, these results highlight the importance of thinking about new strategies and new technologies to monitor our patients with at-risk AMD,” Ho said.