Source/Disclosures
Disclosures: Chamberlain is employed by CooperVision, and study was funded by CooperVision.
August 14, 2020
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MiSight contact lenses effective for myopia control

Source/Disclosures
Disclosures: Chamberlain is employed by CooperVision, and study was funded by CooperVision.
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MiSight daily disposable soft contact lenses were effective at slowing myopia progression compared with standard daily disposable lenses, according to study results published in Journal Optometry and Vision Science.

“Myopia represents a growing public health issue, affecting 33% of adults in the United States. ... In the past decade, there has been increased research activity aimed at slowing the progression of myopia by optical methods, including overnight corneal reshaping contact lenses (orthokeratology) and soft contact lenses,” Paul Chamberlain, BSc, CooperVision, and colleagues wrote. “The clinical trial was designed to quantify the effectiveness of the MiSight lenses for slowing juvenile-onset myopia progression.”

Researchers enrolled 144 children with myopia 8 to 12 years old into a multicenter, double-masked, randomized clinical trial. They randomly assigned patients to either MiSight lenses (CooperVision) or control lenses over the duration of 3 years.

Investigators also assessed cycloplegic spherical equivalent refraction (mean error at baseline: 2.02 D in MiSight group vs. 2.19 D in control group) and axial length (mean at baseline: 24.42 mm vs. 24.46 mm, respectively) at baseline and all subsequent follow-up visits.

Paul Chamberlain, BSc
Paul Chamberlain

Study results yielded a 75.5% retention rate (n= 53 MiSight, 56 control) with no serious cases of adverse events. Researchers measured unadjusted change in spherical equivalent refraction at –0.73 D (59%) less in the MiSight group compared with the control group (about –0.51 D vs. about –1.24 D, respectively; P < .001) and mean change in axial length at 0.32 mm (52%) less in the MiSight group compared with the control group (about 0.30 mm vs. about 0.62 mm, respectively; P < .001). They found high correlations among changes in both primary outcomes (r = –0.9; P < .001). They also observed four asymptomatic corneal infiltrative events.

“The progression of refractive error in children is significantly reduced by the MiSight lens compared with a single-vision soft contact lens,” Chamberlain and colleagues concluded. “The axial elongation that underlies and is correlated with refractive error progression is significantly less with the MiSight lens ... and favorable subjective ratings show that contact lens acceptance was sustained across 3 years.”