ARVO

ARVO

Source:

Doll T, et al. Over-the-counter eyelash growth serum use: Self-reported pervasiveness and user satisfaction. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting; May 6, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Doll reports she is a consultant to Allergan, Alcon, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Novartis, Sun and Tissue Tech.
July 21, 2020
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Side effects key reason for discontinuation of eyelash growth serum

Source:

Doll T, et al. Over-the-counter eyelash growth serum use: Self-reported pervasiveness and user satisfaction. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting; May 6, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Doll reports she is a consultant to Allergan, Alcon, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Novartis, Sun and Tissue Tech.
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More than 40% of individuals who tried over-the-counter eyelash growth serums discontinued use of the cosmetic, mostly due to side effects.

“What we know currently about cosmetic over-the-counter eyelash growth serums is that they can contain ingredients that are potentially detrimental to the ocular surface, including synthetic prostaglandins,” Tracy Doll, OD, FAAO, from the Pacific University College of Optometry in Portland, Ore., said during her virtual ARVO presentation. “Not all beauty products are as safe as we would like them to be.”

She explained that synthetic prostaglandins are nearly identical to pharmaceutical versions, including the same potential side effects such as ocular pruritus, conjunctival hyperemia, skin or iris hyperpigmentation and orbital fat displacement. However, synthetic prostaglandins in cosmetics are not under the same regulations of pharmaceutical versions in the U.S., and potential side effects do not need to be listed on packaging.

Doll and colleagues collected data from 212 anonymous adult respondents to an online survey regarding over-the-counter eyelash growth serum (OTC-ELGS) use and satisfaction. Of the 154 who had used OTC-ELGS, 43.5% stopped using the cosmetic. The top reason for discontinuation was side effects (42%), followed by cost (27%) and lack of efficacy (12%).

Tracy Doll, OD, FAAO
Tracy Doll

Among respondents who discontinued use, 46.7% indicated using an OTC-ELGS with synthetic prostaglandins. The three most common brands used, all of which contain synthetic prostaglandins, were Last Boost (Rodan and Fields), GrandeLASH (Grande Cosmetics) and RevitaLash (Nordstrom).

The top methods for obtaining OTC-ELGS included online purchase (n = 37) and via a “consultant” (n = 31).

Doll noted a paradoxical outcome in that OTC-ELGS users were less likely to have dry eye symptoms than those who did not use lash serums or those who discontinued use. This finding, she said, may be due to the fact that those with ocular surface dryness are less likely to tolerate potentially irritating cosmetic around their eyes.

“There is a clear divide between individuals who tolerate the product and those who don’t,” Doll concluded. “We think future studies should focus on which side effects were the most common and potential causes of discontinuation. Additionally, in-person testing of signs of ocular surface dryness in users compared with drop-out users may shed light on patient types who are unlikely to tolerate the cosmetic.”