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ARVO
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Tan Q, et al. Binocular vision characteristics in patients before and after cataract surgery. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting; May 6, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Tan reports no relevant financial disclosures.
July 01, 2020
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Binocular vision problems after cataract surgery linked to prior anomalies

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Tan Q, et al. Binocular vision characteristics in patients before and after cataract surgery. Presented at: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting; May 6, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Tan reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Cataract surgery did not significantly correlate with risk for binocular vision problems; rather, the main risk factor was preexisting non-strabismic binocular vision anomalies, according to a study.

Qing-Qing Tan, MD, PhD, from the North Sichuan Medical College, China, and colleagues found during a literature search that significant indications of strabismic and non-strabismic binocular vision problems after cataract surgery. However, they also found a number of significant limitations.

“While reports show that satisfactory monocular vision is usually achieved after cataract surgery, many patients still complain of vision disturbances,” Tan said during his ARVO presentation. “We aimed to determine the change in prevalence of binocular vision anomalies after cataract surgery.”

Tan and colleagues enrolled 73 patients 50 years old or older (mean, 70 years) who were scheduled for bilateral cataract surgery, 51 of whom completed the postop evaluation.

Both prior to surgery and after, 31 of the 51 patients who completed evaluation received a diagnosis of non-strabismic binocular vision anomalies (NSBVA) for a rate of 60.8%.

Preexisting NSBVA diagnosis was the only predictive factor for postoperative binocular vision anomalies after adjusting for age, sex, interoperative interval and interocular differences in spherical equivalent, visual acuity, axial length and IOL power (adjusted OR = 8.8; P < .01).

“We recommend that optometrists treat patients with any [binocular vision anomaly] and educate patients about the risk of postsurgical binocular vision complications before referring them for cataract surgery, and that cataract surgeons perform a more comprehensive binocular vision evaluation to identify the patients who are at risk,” Tan concluded.