Issue: May/June 2020
Disclosures: Neitz is cofounder of SightGlass Vision. Smith is an advisory board member of and has stock options in SightGlass Vision.
May 07, 2020
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New myopia-control eyeglasses for children show positive outcomes

Issue: May/June 2020
Disclosures: Neitz is cofounder of SightGlass Vision. Smith is an advisory board member of and has stock options in SightGlass Vision.
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SightGlass Vision announced topline results from a trial of the company’s novel eyeglasses designed to slow the progression of myopia in children.

Data from the Control of Myopia Using Peripheral Diffusion Lenses: Efficacy and Safety Study (CYPRESS) trial revealed that each of two test groups showed a reduction in myopia progression up to 74% at 12 months, which was significantly superior to the control group based on measures of axial length and cycloplegic spherical equivalent refraction, the company said in a press release.

Earl L. Smith, OD, PhD, FAAO, FARVO
Earl L. Smith

“This is a terrific result, truly a ‘home run’ in the global effort to reduce myopia progression in children,” Earl L. Smith III, OD, PhD, FAAO, FARVO, Greeman-Petty Professor of the vision department and interim chief health officer at the University of Houston, Texas, said in the release. “It is quite exciting to see these results for both test arms in such a rigorously designed clinical trial. I look forward to seeing future data as I believe these innovative spectacles could be a game changer in the management of myopia in children around the world.”

The CYPRESS study involved 256 children 6 to 10 years old across 14 trial sites in the U.S. and Canada. At baseline, patients had myopia between –0.75 D and –4.5 D (spherical equivalent refraction). Patients used either of two test lens designs or control lenses.

Safety results at 1 year showed that all measures of visual acuity remained clinically stable with no serious adverse events in all three groups.

“Myopia continues to increase dramatically around the world, and new therapies to prevent myopia progression, particularly in young children, are urgently needed,” Jay Neitz, PhD, professor and research director for the department of ophthalmology at the University of Washington, and cofounder of SightGlass Vision, said in the release. “The 12-month findings from CYPRESS are promising. I look forward to seeing our novel spectacles come to fruition so that we can help hundreds of millions of children around the world who continue to be at risk for vision-threatening complications due to high myopia.”

SightGlass Vision stated that a 24-month interim data analysis is planned for 2021.