November 07, 2017
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Center distance multifocal contacts may slow, halt myopia

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Practitioners should consider using multifocal contact lens designs that slow the progression of myopia in children, according to researchers.

The retrospective case series included 32 patients between 6 and 19 years old who were at least -0.50 D with current corrections. The subjects were fit with an extended depth of focus (center distance) multifocal soft contact lens, NaturalVue Multifocal 1 Day Contact Lenses by Visioneering Technologies Inc.

At the initial visit, 44% of patients wore spectacles, 37.5% wore spherical soft contact lenses, 15.6% wore a different soft multifocal contact lens, and 3% wore orthokeratology lenses.

Researchers found reductions in the annualized rate of myopic progression from -0.85 D per year to -0.04 D per year in the right eye and -0.90 D per year to -0.03 D per year in the left eye.

Approximately 98.4% of the children showed reduction of annualized myopic progression, and 91% showed a decrease of 70% or greater, researchers wrote. More than 80% showed complete halting of myopic progression, including 6.25% demonstrating myopic regression.

Researchers believe that the significant reduction of myopic progression was due to the higher amount of plus in the periphery associated with the extended depth of focus optics in the lens design.

“Given the high risk of ocular complications with increased levels of myopia, practitioners should consider using multifocal contact lens designs that slow the progression of myopia in children as a proactive part of their clinical practice,” Cooper and colleagues concluded. – by Abigail Sutton

Disclosures: Cooper is a consultant to VTI, Treehouse Eyes and Magic Leap. Please see the full study for all remaining authors’ financial disclosures.