Glaucoma 360 New Horizons Forum

Glaucoma 360 New Horizons Forum

Source:

Habash R. The future of eye care: Science fiction to science fact. Presented at: Glaucoma 360 New Horizons Forum; Feb. 11, 2022; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Healio/OSN could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.
February 15, 2022
1 min read
Save

Emerging technologies may change ophthalmic landscape

Source:

Habash R. The future of eye care: Science fiction to science fact. Presented at: Glaucoma 360 New Horizons Forum; Feb. 11, 2022; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Healio/OSN could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

SAN FRANCISCO — The ophthalmic landscape is on the cusp of a “massive explosion” in technology, according to a speaker here.

“It’s right at our fingertips, and it’s about to take us for a very interesting ride,” Ranya Habash, MD, said during the opening keynote address at Glaucoma 360 New Horizons Forum.

Ranya Habash

Habash compared emerging eye care technologies to devices used in Star Trek and described the clinical applications of augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR) and artificial intelligence (AI). One of the pieces of technology she described is a smartphone app that can be used for physiologic monitoring of the eye.

“Nowadays, you can actually look at the conjunctival vessels and do physiologic monitoring straight from them,” Habash said. “It’s actually one of the easiest and best places to do it because the smartphone technology that’s in there will actually show you different wavelengths of light and pulsations in the blood vessels.”

Habash also described the “brain-machine interface,” which is the concept of using machine learning to decipher data from bioelectrical activity in the brain. Both wearable and implantable devices can be used to achieve this, she said.

Wearable AR and VR goggles can potentially be used for visual field and macular testing, refraction and monitoring eye movements, she said. Additionally, AI-based therapeutics may be useful for glaucoma, and biosensors may aid with continuous IOP monitoring.