American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting

American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting

Source:

Blehm CG, et al. Femtosecond laser-assisted arcuate incisions versus manual arcuate incisions: Outcomes. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; July 23-27, 2021; Las Vegas.

Disclosures: Blehm reports he receives research funding from Alcon.
July 26, 2021
1 min read
Save

Femtosecond laser arcuate incisions reduce refractive astigmatism

Source:

Blehm CG, et al. Femtosecond laser-assisted arcuate incisions versus manual arcuate incisions: Outcomes. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; July 23-27, 2021; Las Vegas.

Disclosures: Blehm reports he receives research funding from Alcon.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

LAS VEGAS — Arcuate incisions made with a femtosecond laser reduce postoperative refractive astigmatism during cataract surgery, according to a study presented here.

“I was very excited for this project in particular,” Clayton G. Blehm, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting. “Technology fascinates me, but combine that with health care, and sometimes tech is not always beneficial. That’s been part of the question we’ve had for the last 10 years, which is, ‘How much better is femto?’”

Clayton G. Blehm

Blehm conducted a comparative, prospective, randomized contralateral study in 76 eyes of 38 patients. Visual outcomes for incisions made with the LenSx femtosecond laser (Alcon) using the Woodcock nomogram at 90% thickness were compared with those manually made with a fixed keratome diamond knife using the Donnenfeld nomogram. Subjects were assessed at 1 day, 1 month and 3 months after the procedure.

Corneal astigmatism, refractive astigmatism, uncorrected distance visual acuity and manifest refraction were not significantly different between the two groups. Refractive astigmatism was significantly lower at 3 months than at 1 month in both patient groups.

Two nonserious adverse events, which Blehm called the “humbling factor” for any surgeon, occurred in the manual incision group and were addressed without incident.

In addition, the femtosecond laser may have the advantage of earlier stability of refractive and corneal astigmatism.